Registrieren

Gemeinsam Lösungen finden
mit Kompetenz werben

Global nach Kategorien:
Global nach Themen / Center:
Global nach Branchen:
Global nach Regionen:
 

Ergebnis der Suche (25054)

Seite: < | 1 | ... | 337 | 338 | 339 | 340 | 341 | ... | 2506 | >
  • Blog-Eintrag von Jörg Plümacher, ORAYLIS GmbH ORAYLIS Blog | 25.5.2013, 8:37:36 Using “cursors” in PDW

    PDW v1/v2 Did I say cursor? Isn’t this an evil word? Shouldn’t we try as hard as possible to avoid them in database design and especially in a data warehouse? Yes, sure. But there might be some patterns which make it useful to loop over a table, for example a configuration table, and do something with each line of the...

    PDW v1/v2 Did I say cursor? Isn’t this an evil word? Shouldn’t we try as hard as possible to avoid them in database design and especially in a data warehouse? Yes, sure. But there might be some patterns which make it useful to loop over a table, for example a configuration table, and do something with each line of the table. Since PDW currently doesn’t support cursors (why should it?), what can we do? One option is to use the foreach-container in SSIS. It’s a good, reliable and easy way to implement loops. However, if you need to, you can also do this using SQL. The following example shows a loop over all partitions of the FactSalesHeader table: create table #FactSalesHeaderPartitions WITH ( DISTRIBUTION = REPLICATE ) AS SELECT sp.partition_number, prv.value AS boundary_value, lower(sty.name) AS boundary_value_type, sp.rows, row_number() over (order by sp.partition_number) AS RowNr FROM sys.tables st JOIN sys.indexes si ON st.object_id = si.object_id AND si.index_id
  • Blog-Eintrag von Christian Howes , Webtrends Inc. Webtrends Blog | 24.5.2013, 22:45:53 Content Czar or Content by Committee? How to Organize for Content Marketing

        (Editor’s Note: This blog first appeared on May 20, 2013 on Shopigniter.com. Re-posted here with permission.)  Who doesn’t love Altimeter Group, right?  Low cost (FREE!), high-quality research on relevant industry trends.  Plus Susan Etlinger is just, like, the nicest. In an April 25th report...

        (Editor’s Note: This blog first appeared on May 20, 2013 on Shopigniter.com. Re-posted here with permission.)  Who doesn’t love Altimeter Group, right?  Low cost (FREE!), high-quality research on relevant industry trends.  Plus Susan Etlinger is just, like, the nicest. In an April 25th report entitled Organizing for Content: Models to Incorporate Content Strategy and Content Marketing in the Enterprise analyst Rebecca Lieb takes on – you guessed it – different ways to organize for kicking out kick-ass content. Rebecca identifies six different models.  Below, I’m going to advocate for the one that, in my experience, I think is the most broadly effective no matter the size of your organization.  But, before we get to my advocating and analyzing, a little background on the report and some nuggets of wisdom (I read it so you don’t have to!). About Organizing for Content: Models to Incorporate Content Strategy and Content Marketing in the Enterprise: The report looks at “scalable organizational models for addressing content needs across the enterprise and makes recommendations for a holistic program…” It is based on “…78 interviews with executives actively engage din the evolution of content strategy and/or content marketing in their organizations.  The qualitative interviews were conducted with representatives from B2B and B2C companies between October and December 2011 and January and March 2013.” The research notes that, “New channels and platforms, coupled with a trend that de-emphasizes the written word in favor of visual and audio-visual content, creates new skill demands.”  Translation: maybe you should swap that intern blogger for a videographer (hey, that rhymes!). Why do you need to organize for content strategy?  Well, this is why…(duh)… Because brands, “…divide up content responsibilities between divisions that are not necessarily interconnected or in regular communication with one another.  This fragmented approach leads to inconsistent messaging, huge variations in voice, tone, brand and messaging and an inconsistent customer experience.” Nuggets of Wisdom: 57% of respondents identified content marketing as their “top external social strategy objective” for 2013 The average organization is responsible for continual and increasing content demands of 178 social media properties “Brands have evolved into media companies.”  You’ve no doubt heard this before.  And you might’ve also heard Red Bull referred to as a publisher who makes energy drinks.  But, did you know that Red Bull tweets up to 200 times per day?  No matter how you slice it, generating even just that many tweets – never mind all of their other content, takes strategy and coordination. Elements of Content Strategy: According to the report, these are the elements every enterprise needs to first consider before tackling how to organize for producing and distributing content: Strategy: both a vision for message, but an understanding of the tools and organization you need; also clarity on approval and publishing processes. Authority/Management: an executive or governing body must have cross-functional and multidivisional visibility and purview to efficiently operate and call the shots. Staff: At Dell, Executive Director Marketing Marissa Tarleton says (according to the report),“Over half of my organization is responsible for content.” – skills folks should be staffing up for content-wise include copywriting, journalism, video production, graphic design, photography, etc. Technology: tools for production and measurement (like ShopIgniter!), collaboration and management, content curation, aggregation, publishing, etc. Measurement: this is obvious, yet lack of over-arching, cross-divisional strategy was common problem. Audit: regular cross-organization audit of all content that exists is critical. Unified Guidelines and Playbook: you need things like an editorial calendar, style and brand guide, rules for voice, tone and brand and persona map. Training: Dell rigorously trains anyone who writes or publishes on behalf of the brand.  Wells Fargo teamed with an industry trade organization to create a “university”. Models for Content Marketing Organization: Content Center of Excellence: A consortium of experts from a variety of organizational divisions working cross-departmentally Editorial Board or Content Council: Content creators and/or marketing executives from divisions, including marketing, communications, PR and social media working collaboratively Content Lead: An executive who oversees an organization’s content initiatives.  Titles range from editor-in-chief to global content strategist Executive Steering Committee: A cross-functional strategic group comprised of senior executives Cross-Functional Content Chief: Chief Content Officer, Head of Digital Strategy.  A senior executive who is the Boss of Content (this person has cross-departmental authority and is more centralized than the Content Lead model) Content Department/Division: in-house or agency; large scale, high-volume content creation This is the part of the show where I encourage you to read the entire report in depth to better understand the Pros & Cons of each of these models and how they would actually operate, which Lieb explores carefully and thoroughly. Obviously, different models may work better for different organizations.  If you’re a Dell and have both large budgets and large staff, you can probably support a Content Department – and you probably need one to pump out the high volume of content that you need.  But, not everybody’s Dell.  Dell’s Dell. What do I think is the most broadly applicable model?  Good question.  Let’s take a look at, in my experience, what the common challenges are in creating and sustaining an effective content machine: Cross departmental cooperation Centralized strategy, vision, messaging & tone Consistent creation of high quality, innovative, fun, interesting content In my experience, the Cross-Functional Content Chief model – as expressed by the title Chief Content Officer or Head of Digital Strategy, etc. – probably works best for the largest number of organizations. Assuming that person is granted the appropriate cross-departmental authority and visibility that he deserves, and can staff up appropriately to fit his or her needs, this model best addresses the challenges I’ve outlined above.  They should be senior enough to move the chess pieces they need to move cross-functionally throughout the enterprise, they solve the ‘unified vision, strategy, messaging & tone’ issue and, assuming that they’re a modern day Don Draper, the content that they drive should be great. Now…finding a modern day Don Draper to run your content marketing machine…that’s a different story. I’m available.  But, it should be noted, I don’t have Don’s hair.  On the plus side, I don’t have his drinking problem, either. How is your enterprise organizing for content marketing?  Are you using something that looks like the models identified above?  Or have you found your own way or a better way of tackling the content marketing strategy and organization challenge?
  • Blog-Eintrag von Felix Höger , PIRONET NDH Business-Cloud | 24.5.2013, 12:54:36 Windows XP: Never change a running System?

    Microsoft Windows blickt mittlerweile auf eine gewisse Geschichte zurück. Seit das Betriebssystem in seiner Version 3.1 im Jahr 1992 erstmals eine breite Nutzerschaft erreichte, waren die Versionen mal mehr und mal weniger erfolgreich und beliebt. Auf manche sichere und stabile Version folgte manch unverständlicher...

    Microsoft Windows blickt mittlerweile auf eine gewisse Geschichte zurück. Seit das Betriebssystem in seiner Version 3.1 im Jahr 1992 erstmals eine breite Nutzerschaft erreichte, waren die Versionen mal mehr und mal weniger erfolgreich und beliebt. Auf manche sichere und stabile Version folgte manch unverständlicher Rückschlag, der die Anwender ratlos vor ihren Bildschirmen verzweifeln ließ. Knapp zehn Jahre nach der Einführung von Windows 3.1 stellte Microsoft dann Windows XP vor. Es erschien am 25. Oktober 2001 und es dauerte nicht lange, bis sich die meisten Nutzer einig waren, dass Windows nun gewissermaßen „angekommen“ sei. Die Oberfläche war optisch ansprechend und leicht zu bedienen, die von Haus aus große Treiberdatenbank vereinfachte den Anschluss von Zusatzgeräten und alle, die noch Windows 98 kannten, waren schier Fassungslos, dass XP teils Wochen oder gar Monate laufen konnte ohne ein einziges Mal abzustürzen. Kurz: Das Produkt hatte einen Reifegrad erreicht, der Fragen nach Verbesserung und Weiterentwicklung oftmals gar nicht mehr aufkommen ließ. Dadurch wurde Windows zum ersten Mal auf das reduziert, was es eigentlich immer sein sollte: Ein Betriebssystem. Nicht mehr und nicht weniger. Mittelstand oftmals noch mit Betriebssystem-Oldie Die neuere Geschichte von Windows ist hinlänglich bekannt. Windows Vista darf, gemessen am Erfolg, als gescheitertes Experiment betrachtet werden und Windows 8 ist zu neu und zu avantgardistisch, als dass man es zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt sinnvoll bewerten könnte. Was fehlt? Richtig, da gibt es ja auch noch Windows 7. Mit dieser Version hat Microsoft eigentlich alles richtig gemacht. Von XP bekannte Tugenden wie geringer Ressourcenverbrauch und hohe Systemstabilität wurden konsequent weiterentwickelt, Sicherheitskonzept, Treibersuite und Oberfläche in die Neuzeit überführt. Dem ganz großen Erfolg dieser Variante stand bislang vor allem einer im Weg: Der eigene Großvater! Nicht zuletzt durch die verlorene Generation Vista hatte Windows XP sehr viel Raum, um sich zu verbreiten. Entsprechend groß ist nach wie vor das Angebot an kompatiblen Anwendungen und Treibern. Im deutschen Mittelstand setzen immer noch rund 50 Prozent der Unternehmen auf den Betriebssystem-Oldie. Die Gründe dafür sind so vielfältig wie plausibel: Die XP-Lizenzen sind längst abgeschrieben und belasten das Budget nicht mehr, die Admins und die User kennen das System wie ihre Westentasche, manche für den Geschäftsbetrieb unerlässliche Spezialsoftware wurde im XP-Zeitalter geschrieben und wird heute nicht mehr weiterentwickelt oder es greift schlicht die alte Lösung: Never change a running System! April 2014: Schluss, aus, vorbei! Ja, wir hätten noch ewig mit XP weiterarbeiten können. Doch unlängst gab Microsoft selbst den schnöden Spielverderber und beschwor über den Köpfen der XP-Nutzerschaft das Damoklesschwert herauf, im April 2014 endgültig den Support für Windows XP (und Office 2003) einzustellen. Nicht, dass sich XP die Rente nicht redlich verdient hätte oder die Überraschung über das baldige Aus übermäßig groß wäre, führt die Entscheidung von Microsoft doch zu einigem Verdruss. Denn die Einstellung des Supports wird in absehbarer Zeit folgende Konsequenzen haben: Für Sicherheitslücken im Betriebssystem werden keine Patches mehr angeboten Neue Anwendungen werden schon bald nicht mehr mit Windows XP kompatibel sein Updates für Software von Drittanbietern werden nicht mehr für XP angeboten Neue Gerätetreiber werden für XP nicht mehr zur Verfügung gestellt Abwarten wird teurer als Handeln Ohne an dieser Stelle schwarzmalen zu wollen drängt sich für mich eine Schlussfolgerung auf: Früher oder Später wird der Zug XP gegen die Wand fahren. Das ist unvermeidlich. Eines haben wir allerdings in der Hand: Ob wir noch im Zug sitzen wenn es soweit ist! Viele IT-Entscheider fürchteten den fälligen Umstieg bislang vor allem wegen der damit verbundenen Kosten und Risiken. Und da ist auch was dran. Es müssen neue Lizenzen erworben werden, es wird Personal gebunden und natürlich ist jede große Systemumstellung mit der ein oder anderen Anlaufschwierigkeit verbunden. Dennoch ist inzwischen ein Punkt erreicht, an dem Abwarten teurer ist als Handeln. Denn noch ist Zeit, um den Umstieg in aller Ruhe zu planen und vorzubereiten. Man kann gegebenenfalls noch eine Weile zweigleisig fahren und Systeme nach und nach Umstellen. Man kann ohne Druck testen und verwerfen, um schließlich auf alle mit dem Umzug verbundenen Fragen befriedigende Antworten zu finden. Noch gibt es keinen unmittelbaren Zwang, der einen stressigen Umzug „über Nacht“ erforderlich macht. Dieses sich schließende Zeitfenster gilt es zu nutzen! Dabei bietet es sich an, auf Experten-Know-how zurückzugreifen. Auf diese Weise profitieren „wechselwillige“ nicht nur von der Erfahrung aus vielen erfolgreichen Umzugsprojekten, sondern entlasten geleichzeitig die eigenen IT-Mitarbeiter, die den Projektdruck nicht alleine tragen müssen und darüber hinaus weiterhin Zeit für andere Aufgaben finden. Gehen wir´s an!
  • Frage von Volker Schnaars, kontextb2b Marketing Consulting an das Netzwerk der Competence Site | 24.5.2013, 11:48:47 Über einen TED-Vortrag von Marcus Sheridan...

    Verraten wird: die "geheime Zutat" wirksamen Marketings. http://www.inbound-marketing-solutions.de/q3jn (http://www.inbound-marketing-solutions.de/q3jn)

    Verraten wird: die "geheime Zutat" wirksamen Marketings.

    http://www.inbound-marketing-solutions.de/q3jn

  • Wie wichtig sind DMS und Filesharing? Fazit der Fachmesse Control 2013 in Stuttgart
    Frage von Linda Holz , iGrafx GmbH an Linda Holz | 24.5.2013, 11:06:12 Wie wichtig sind DMS und Filesharing? Fazit der Fachmesse Control 2013 in Stuttgart

    PRESSEMELDUNG Control 2013: Effizientes Dokumentenmanagement und Filesharing gewinnen an Bedeutung Besucher der Control 2013 zeigen reges Interesse an iGrafx-Lösungen (http://www.igrafx.com/solutions) Karlsfeld bei München / Stuttgart, 23. Mai 2013. Die wachsende Komplexität von...  mehr

    PRESSEMELDUNG

    Control 2013: Effizientes Dokumentenmanagement und Filesharing gewinnen an Bedeutung

    Besucher der Control 2013 zeigen reges Interesse an iGrafx-Lösungen

    Karlsfeld bei München / Stuttgart, 23. Mai 2013. Die wachsende Komplexität von Geschäftsprozessen und die projektbezogene Zusammenarbeit in Unternehmen erfordern Lösungen, die dies unterstützen. Effizientes Dokumentenmanagement und Collaboration waren auch auf der Fachmesse Control 2013 in Stuttgart die vorherrschenden Themen am Stand von iGrafx, Spezialist für Business Process Management (BPM).

     

    Unternehmensweit organisierte Teams und Projektgruppen gehören heute zum Alltag eines modernen Unternehmens. Zugleich werden die Prozesse und Strukturen, innerhalb derer sie sich bewegen, immer komplexer. „Die Arbeit solcher Projektgruppen steht und fällt mit professionellem Dokumentenmanagement und mit IT-Tools, die eine unternehmensweite, teamübergreifende Collaboration unterstützen“, erklärt Stefan Hessenbruch, Professional Services Manager EMEA bei iGrafx. „Nur wenn alle Beteiligten einfach und schnell auf alle relevanten Prozesse und Dokumente zugreifen können, sind sie als Team in der Lage, effizient zu arbeiten und qualitativ hochwertige Arbeitsergebnisse zu liefern.“

     

    Vor diesem Hintergrund gewinnen die BPM-Lösungen von iGrafx an Bedeutung, wie sich am Interesse der Fachbesucher der Control 2013 in Stuttgart zeigte. Denn automatisches Dokumentenmanagement und Filesharing sind in allen iGrafx-Produkten und -Lösungen vollwertig integriert. Damit unterstützt der BPM-Spezialist die genannten Anforderungen modern organisierter Unternehmen optimal.

     

    Zweites zentrales Thema auf der Control 2013 war iGrafx for SAP, die Schnittstelle zwischen iGrafx und dem SAP Solution Manager. Stefan Hessenbruch: „Immer mehr Unternehmen arbeiten mit SAP und fragen daher nach Lösungen, mit denen sie ihre betriebswirtschaftlichen Anforderungen aus Prozesssicht definieren und so die Lücke zwischen Business und IT schließen können.“

     

    Unter anderem kann der Anwender mit iGrafx for SAP zuverlässig identifizieren, wo Geschäftsprozesse von SAP-Systemen unterstützt werden und diese grafisch einprägsam darstellen. Zudem lassen sich mit diesem Tool nach umfassender Simulationsanalyse die besten Prozessänderungs-Möglichkeiten ermitteln.

     

    Auf großes Interesse stießen bei den Fachbesuchern der Control 2013 auch iGrafx FlowCharter und iGrafx Process Central. Insgesamt, so Stefan Hessenbruch, sei man mit der Besucherresonanz auf der Messe sehr zufrieden. „Viele unserer Bestandskunden kamen bei uns am Stand vorbei, um sich über die aktuellen Entwicklungen und Produkte von iGrafx zu informieren. Das ist für uns eine Bestätigung, dass unsere Kunden treu und mit unseren Produkten und Services zufrieden sind.“

  • Blog-Eintrag von Dr. Helge Lach , Deutsche Vermögensberatung AG DVAG Unternehmensblog - Blog | 24.5.2013, 8:20:02 Wenn Pflege, dann Bahr …

    Wenn Pflege, dann Bahr, so der Aufmacher eines lesenswerten Beitrags in der aktuellen Ausgabe der Zeitschrift €uro (S. 112 ff.). Pro Monat 5 Euro staatlicher Zuschuss bei einem Mindest-Eigenbeitrag von 10 Euro – das ist absolut gesehen nicht die Welt, aber wo sonst gibt es 50 Prozent Zuschuss auf die Eigenleistung? Und...

    Wenn Pflege, dann Bahr, so der Aufmacher eines lesenswerten Beitrags in der aktuellen Ausgabe der Zeitschrift €uro (S. 112 ff.). Pro Monat 5 Euro staatlicher Zuschuss bei einem Mindest-Eigenbeitrag von 10 Euro – das ist absolut gesehen nicht die Welt, aber wo sonst gibt es 50 Prozent Zuschuss auf die Eigenleistung? Und die sollte man sich sichern. Völlig richtig weist dann aber die Zeitschrift darauf hin, dass ein solcher Vertrag alleine bei weitem nicht ausreicht, genauso wie z.B. die Riesterrente in der Altersversorgung. Mit rund 600 Euro monatlicher Pflegerente darf ein schwerst Pflegebedürftiger aus einem Pflege-Bahr-Vertrag rechnen. Benötigt werden aber im Schnitt rund 1.700 Euro. Deshalb der Rat: Abschluss eines Kombitarifes, der den staatlichen Zuschuss sichert und gleichzeitig die Minimalleistung aufstockt. Erfreulich: Bei den dargestellten Tarifvergleichen – bis auf eine Ausnahme – immer unter den Top 4: Die Central Krankenversicherung.
  • Blog-Eintrag von Jan-Hendrik Wiemann ControllingBlog | 24.5.2013, 8:15:55 Gemeinsam in die Liga der Champions

    Seit 2007 bestehen Beziehungen zwischen dem Internationalen Controller Verein (ICV) und der Russischen Controllervereinigung unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Sergey Falko, Baumann Universität Moskau. Ständige Kontakte und gegenseitige Besuche sind seit Jahren zu einer guten Selbstverständlichkeit geworden, regelmäßig...

    Seit 2007 bestehen Beziehungen zwischen dem Internationalen Controller Verein (ICV) und der Russischen Controllervereinigung unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Sergey Falko, Baumann Universität Moskau. Ständige Kontakte und gegenseitige Besuche sind seit Jahren zu einer guten Selbstverständlichkeit geworden, regelmäßig unterstützt der ICV die russischen Kollegen bei der Organisation von Fachtagungen und Symposien, u.a. durch Vermittlung von Experten als Referenten. Zum Abschluss des III. Internationalen Controlling-Kongresses zum Thema Green-Controlling – erneut mit starker Beteiligung von ICV-Spezialisten – am 17. Mai 2013 in St. Petersburg habe ich in meinen Grußworten diese zunehmend intensivere Kooperation angesprochen und gewürdigt. In unserer immer engeren Zusammenarbeit werden beide Organisationen “zum Champion”. Das bevorstehende Champions-League-Finale am 25. Mai zwischen den beiden deutschen Finalisten FC Bayern München und Borussia Dortmund im Blick, überreichte ich Prof. Falko einen Bayern-Schal als symbolisches Gastgeschenk.
  • Blog-Eintrag von Jan-Hendrik Wiemann ControllingBlog | 24.5.2013, 8:04:39 Veranstaltung: Braucht Controlling eigentlich noch Controller?

    Der provokanten Frage “Wer braucht in Zukunft noch Controller?” geht die Veranstaltung “WHU Campus for Controlling 2013″ in Vallendar auf den Grund. Grundlage für diesen Fokus ist die Entwicklung des Berufsbild des Controllers hin zum Business Partner. Dadurch sind die Controller näher am Management. Gleichzeitig aber...

    Der provokanten Frage “Wer braucht in Zukunft noch Controller?” geht die Veranstaltung “WHU Campus for Controlling 2013″ in Vallendar auf den Grund. Grundlage für diesen Fokus ist die Entwicklung des Berufsbild des Controllers hin zum Business Partner. Dadurch sind die Controller näher am Management. Gleichzeitig aber haben Manager gelernt, wie Controller zu denken. Dazu kommen neue Entwicklungen der IT, die Zahlen und Modelle der Controller auch für Nicht-Controller zugänglich und transparenter machen. Ob der Controller für den Manager deshalb überflüssig wird, ist zu diskutieren: beim 7. WHU-Campus for Controlling am 13. September 2013 an der WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management. Weitere Infos im Veranstaltungsbereich der ICV-Webseite
  • Blog-Eintrag von Jan-Hendrik Wiemann ControllingBlog | 24.5.2013, 7:44:15 Wie wichtig ist das Projektteam für den Projekterfolg?

    Jan-Hendrik Jensen von der Universität Flensburg hat uns um Mithilfe gebeten. Im Rahmen seiner Bachelorarbeit hat er einen Fragebogen erstellt, der sich an Menschen richtet, die mehr oder weniger regelmäßig an Projekten mitarbeiten. Der Student möchte herausfinden, wie wichtig die Zusammensetzung einer Projektgruppe...

    Jan-Hendrik Jensen von der Universität Flensburg hat uns um Mithilfe gebeten. Im Rahmen seiner Bachelorarbeit hat er einen Fragebogen erstellt, der sich an Menschen richtet, die mehr oder weniger regelmäßig an Projekten mitarbeiten. Der Student möchte herausfinden, wie wichtig die Zusammensetzung einer Projektgruppe für den Erfolg des Projekts ist. Mitmachen unter https://www.umfrageonline.com/s/9c02442
  • Christian Howes
    Blog-Eintrag von Christian Howes , Webtrends Inc. Webtrends Blog | 23.5.2013, 19:08:00 The Hidden Factors That Drive Social Media Behavior and Success

    [From the Editor: A version of this article was first published on ClickZ. The post is the fifth in a series on social marketing and brand building.] We’ve all heard the age-old saying: the customer is king. But the evolution of social marketing has taken this adage to a whole new level. Today, the social end user is king. And...

    [From the Editor: A version of this article was first published on ClickZ. The post is the fifth in a series on social marketing and brand building.] We’ve all heard the age-old saying: the customer is king. But the evolution of social marketing has taken this adage to a whole new level. Today, the social end user is king. And that king has more power than ever before. For brands, this is critical. Specifically, understanding how and why this balance has shifted is a prequisite to social campaign success. For example, consider the traditional experience of “opting-in.” We volunteer personal data and give a brand permission to contact us; essentially, we trade data and access for information and inclusion. But this exchange also shifts the balance of power in favor of the brand. They control the frequency and intensity of the relationship, pushing out content when and how they choose. Only at that point can users react by engaging, ignoring or unsubscribing altogether. However, this balance of power is completely reversed in social. We’re able to proactively access the latest content from any brand at any time and can do so fairly anonymously. “Opting in” – i.e. gaining information or inclusion from a desired brand – really just means navigating to that brand’s Twitter feed or Facebook page and engaging as we like. And unless we virtually raise our hands – by liking, following, commenting or otherwise interacting with what we see – the brand doesn’t know much about us at all. For the end user, this is incredibly empowering. And it creates a set of expectations of how we think social should work for us: Expectations of control (we choose how and when we consume social content). Expectations of accessibility (a brand is only a tweet away). Expectations of speed (we want the latest information, and we want it now). Why This Matters to Marketers These expectations also reflect a larger paradigm: in social, brands are NOT in the position of power. End users are. That means you can’t just craft the perfect tweet or design the world’s sexiest Facebook app and expect users to come running. Success hinges more on the internal: the psychology of a social user and what motivates their action (or inaction). This is especially important for brands looking to run interactive social campaigns, ones based on experiences and actions, not just consumption of content. Specifically, the psychology of social users translates into critical factors that can make or break campaign success. Some of these factors are fairly obvious – including tone and type of content offered, when and where to post and how a campaign is presented – and well covered throughout the rest of this site. But I want to draw your attention to three factors that don’t get as much attention, but ultimately play a huge role in determining how a campaign performs. 1. Ego Part of the beauty of social is the ability to track just how many people deem your campaign worthy enough to share with their colleagues and friends. But here’s one thing we overlook: the amount of shares you receive isn’t purely a function of the number of users with large follower/fan counts spreading your content; there’s another underlying motive at play. Specifically, a recent study by social sharing platform 33Across revealed that sharing is often motivated by a user’s ego. In other words, every share is an exercise in personal branding, meaning it’s not always about what’s being shared, but whom it’s being shared with. Even more enlightening: we don’t even necessarily care that other people engage with what we share; we just care that they saw we shared it. That should raise a key question for marketers running campaigns: Are my content/posts structured in a way that would help raise the profile of the user among her networks, or does it come off as dull or shallow corporate content? 2. Value Many of our social campaigns culminate in some sort of prize. We tend to equate that prize with “value.” But a closer look at successful social campaigns reveals a different trend: the key isn’t delivering value; it’s delivering incentivized value. In other words, not only is there a prize to be won, but the best campaigns deliver latent benefits to users just for taking action. Last week’s promotion from Klout and American Airlines exemplifies this perfectly. There was an overall prize (access to an American Airlines VIP lounge) based off a simple action (login to Klout). But the nature of the campaign also incentivized two further actions: 1) increase your interaction with Klout (in the hopes of boosting your score and redeeming a prize) and 2) share the promotion with friends (for a bonus entry). But that wasn’t all. The campaign also subtly capitalized on the aforementioned notion that personal ego drives sharing. After all, people often rush to share about exclusivity, or exciting things they’ve experienced or won. By making such an exclusive prize readily attainable (VIP lounge passes were awarded to anyone with a Klout score of 55 or higher), the campaign actively incentivized participation by giving users an easy avenue to tout their status – and boost their social ego. 3. Momentum Call it the “morning after” effect. You launch an amazing campaign to tremendous Day 1 acclaim…but then the next day comes. And what was cool a day ago is now old news. The reason? The immediacy, accessibility and sheer volume of content available via social mean users need an incredibly compelling reason to engage beyond the first touch. Social users expect new, they expect fresh, and they expect it constantly. The challenge for marketers, then, is to create sustainable campaigns that can generate interaction and visibility even after the initial buzz has subsided. Practically speaking, this means understanding that even a fantastic promotion or attention-commanding creative concept requires more than just a one-time experience. Challenge yourself to think of the next step in the user’s journey: Is there an incentive to re-engage? Do all of your content and offers need to be released at once, or can it be staggered to prolong engagement? If you do stagger your content, what’s your plan to ensure you can maintain user interest throughout the duration of your timeframe? Constantly focusing on “that next step” will help reveal where the holes are in your engagement strategy, and where “this is awesome” might fall off to “that was awesome. The Takeaway Social doesn’t just change the means through which we engage with customers. It changes the very balance of power inherent in that relationship. It’s also a moving target. For as established as social is now, it continues to evolve, particularly in the recognition of the psychological and sociological factors that drive user behavior. Successful marketing means staying at the forefront of understanding these shifts. What worked a year ago in social may not necessarily work today – not because it’s any less of a great idea or campaign, but because the space has changed and users’ decisions and actions are driven by ever-developing and ever-shifting motivators. Today, more than ever, the social user is king. And the brands that account and adjust for its continued evolution are the ones that’ll succeed both now and tomorrow.
Seite: < | 1 | ... | 239 | ... | 329 | ... | 337 | 338 | 339 | 340 | 341 | ... | 349 | ... | 439 | ... | 1339 | ... | 2506 | >
Anbieter
current time: 2014-07-23 21:58:21 live
generated in 1.677 sec